Tag Archives: image editing

DxO Photolab and DNG


John Rylands Library, Manchester.
John Rylands Library, Manchester. Fuji X-T2, 10-24mm at 12mm, ISO800, 1/3″ at f/7.1. Handheld leaning on the stair handrail for support.

I have been experimenting with DxO Photolab again. I really like the software but before I can commit to buying it, I need it to support the Fuji XTrans RAW file format. If I can’t process the Fuji X-T2 files, it’s only going to work for a fraction of the images I shoot.

Then I had an idea. What if I convert the RAW file to DNG first using Iridient XTransformer. I felt sure I had used a much earlier version of DxO to process RAW files.

Unfortunately, my excitement was short lived. DxO Photolabs couldn’t read the file.

So instead of writing about a great work around, I’m going to share an image shot with the Fuji X-T2 and converted in Lightroom. This has then had a little post processing with On1 Photo Effects to emphasise the shadows. The stars around the lights were enhanced very slightly using Topaz Star Effects.

Best Image Editors Compared: On1 Photo RAW 2018


I just published a new video in my series comparing the best photo editors. This time it’s the turn of On1 Photo RAW 2018. I have used On1 products for many years, but the software never really impressed me. Instead I gravitated to the Nik Collection due to the great results and ease of use.

Despite this I continued to purchase each new version and I’m pleased I have. The software has now matured into an excellent editing tool. It’s very usable and resulting image is free from artefacts. It also provides a great deal of control over the adjustments with the masking tools, which I show in the video.

I won’t say any more as I need to save it for the comparisons video, later in the series.

Enjoy the video.

Dramatic Sunset Processing – Have I Crossed a Line


I wanted to share this recent video I posted on YouTube and ask an important question.

Is what I’m doing in this video “cheating”?

Personally, I think it falls into a grey area. I’m not sure it’s exactly “cheating” but I do feel that it’s starting to cross a line. It would be good to hear readers thoughts.

Friday Image No.172


Blackpool pier and beach
Blackpool pier and beach. Fuji X-T2, Fuji 18-55 lens, ISO200, 1/450″ at f/8.0. Handheld.

On Monday, just before the arrival of the snow and arctic winds in the UK, I visited Blackpool. I have already shared one of the images from that trip, where the performance of the Fuji 18-55 lens quite literally amazed me. This post shows another image from the trip, also shot with the same lens. The processing was applied in Lightroom and then with the Nik Collection.

If you’re interested in the processing, I posted the entire thing to my You Tube channel.

http://bit.ly/Robin-YouTube

The image was captured handheld with the Fuji X-T2 using the Fuji 18-55 lens. I would have loved to have used a filter on the sky, but I didn’t have any with me. There was also some clutter in the bottom left of the frame that has been cropped out in the final image.

I hope you like the image and video.

Have a great weekend.

Processing the Trinnacle Rock


A few blog readers appear to like my recent Trinnacle Rock image, so I decided to publish a video on You Tube demonstrating the editing. But rather than just concentrate on the editing, I have tried to share my thought process around the editing. This explains the how and why of my processing decisions.

The video’s embedded below and if you haven’t already seen my Lenscraft You Tube channel please take a moment to subscribe.

Looking for a Nik Collection Alternative


Sony RX10 image following processing in On 1 Photo RAW. One of the alternatives to the Nik Collection.

It seems that there’s growing concern over how long the Nik Collection will now last. Many photographers have already started to look for alternatives. Whilst I personally think this is a little soon, it doesn’t hurt to be prepared. And judging by some of the emails I’m now receiving, there is a lot of worry and confusion.

I had intended to include an article in this month’s Lenscraft newsletter to discuss some options. But on reflection, I think it’s worth me publishing the article so everyone can share. If you’re interested, here is the link to the article titled Find Your Nik Collection Alternative and Stop Worrying.

I hope you find it useful.

New Affinity Photo


I’m sat here playing around with this photo. Nothing new I suspect your saying to yourself. This difference though is this is on my iPad. And even better, it’s not Adobe Photoshop Express, its Affinity Photo for iPad.

When I opened my emails this morning I found one from Serif that I had been waiting for. It was the launch of the new Affinity Photo for iPad. I quickly logged in to the App Store and found the software. My immediate reaction though was disappointment. It was only scoring a couple of stars.

A closer look at the comments revealed what seemed to be a lot of people suffering compatibility issues and giving the app one star. I’m using an iPad Pro 9.7 which is only a few months old so I decided to take a chance and purchased the software for the introductory £19.99. Boy, am I pleased that I did.

Now for the downside. The interface is complex and a little difficult to get used to. But if you preserver it becomes quite easy and in some cases intuitive. That said, the reason I think it’s complicated is that this is one powerful piece of software. You would be forgiven for thinking this is a full computer application.

This software blows any other photo editing app (that I know of) out of the water completely. Period. Game over.

I’m stunned by what this software seems able to do.

I’m not going to say much more at this point but I hope to do some articles on it in the future once I get familiar with the functions and features. If you want a closer look, here is the link to the Affinity site

https://affinity.serif.com/en-gb/photo/ipad/