New Affinity Photo


I’m sat here playing around with this photo. Nothing new I suspect your saying to yourself. This difference though is this is on my iPad. And even better, it’s not Adobe Photoshop Express, its Affinity Photo for iPad.

When I opened my emails this morning I found one from Serif that I had been waiting for. It was the launch of the new Affinity Photo for iPad. I quickly logged in to the App Store and found the software. My immediate reaction though was disappointment. It was only scoring a couple of stars.

A closer look at the comments revealed what seemed to be a lot of people suffering compatibility issues and giving the app one star. I’m using an iPad Pro 9.7 which is only a few months old so I decided to take a chance and purchased the software for the introductory £19.99. Boy, am I pleased that I did.

Now for the downside. The interface is complex and a little difficult to get used to. But if you preserver it becomes quite easy and in some cases intuitive. That said, the reason I think it’s complicated is that this is one powerful piece of software. You would be forgiven for thinking this is a full computer application.

This software blows any other photo editing app (that I know of) out of the water completely. Period. Game over.

I’m stunned by what this software seems able to do.

I’m not going to say much more at this point but I hope to do some articles on it in the future once I get familiar with the functions and features. If you want a closer look, here is the link to the Affinity site

https://affinity.serif.com/en-gb/photo/ipad/

7 thoughts on “New Affinity Photo

Add yours

  1. Robin
    The colours you have produced on this photo are sensational. The patience you apply to your editing must be totally necessary to give these results.
    Regards
    Aughton

    1. Thank you. I was about to respond to say it doesn’t take much effort and then realised it probably took me an hour to produce this image.
      Two tips that I must do a video about:

      1. When you add orange or a similar warm colour to a scene, don’t add it globally. It usually looks better if you also include a cooler blue colour in near to it. That’s why I try to keep some blue sky visible.
      2. Where shadows or a dark area has a harsh edge, its usually better to open the shadow to show detail. It stops the shadow from being too dark and distracting.

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