Tag Archives: camera profile

Best Fuji Profile for Green

The Peak District. Fuji X-T2, 18-135 lens, ISO200, f/13.0, 1/60″.

If you’re a Fuji shooter who uses Lightroom to process your RAW files, I’m sure you will appreciate the excellent Fuji Colour Profiles. Although Lightroom provides a default Adobe Standard profile, it’s often worth experimenting with some of the other Fuji profiles found in the Camera Calibration tab.

In the past, I have tended to favour the Provia profile for most of my images. Recently though I have found the Provia effect a little too strong. This is especially true where there is a lot of green in the image such as grass or trees. The images end up being too saturated with emerald green grass which is difficult to correct.

Now I have a new favourite profile for the Landscape scene. Where there is a lot of green in a picture shot during the day, I’m finding the “Camera Pro Neg. Std” profile produces better results. This profile seems to provide a much more realistic starting point for the typical landscape scene. Whilst it tends to be a little weak on the saturation, it does produce much more realistic and natural colours, especially for the greens in the scene.

If you shoot Landscape scenes in RAW with a Fuji, I would encourage you to try this profile.

Roll Your Own Camera Profiles

Have you ever wanted to tweak the camera profiles in Lightroom? Or perhaps you have wondered how Camera Profiles are created? Perhaps you don’t like the profiles that ship with your camera and want to create something better.

This short video introduces you to a great free tool from Adobe that allows you to generate new, bespoke camera profiles and install these to Lightroom. I demonstrate the process using RAW files from a Fuji X-T2 but you can apply this to any camera which shoots RAW. Just watch the video, download the software and in 5 minutes you will have created your own profile.

If I had to take a guess, I suspect 98% of you reading this will never have seen this technique before. Don’t miss out.

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Installing Camera Profiles in Lightroom

Clappersgate Bridge, The Lake District. Olympus EM5 with Infrared Conversion.
Clappersgate Bridge, The Lake District. Olympus EM5 with Infrared Conversion.

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If you’re a Lightroom user and aren’t familiar with changing your Camera Profile, be sure to watch this. There is a second part to this video which is coming soon and I doubt many people will have seen anything like it before.

The image you see above is the RAW file used in the video once it’s been fully processed.

Don’t Forget Camera Calibration

Woodland at Mount Rainier, Washington, USA. Olympus EM5, ISO400, f/4.5. Handheld.
Woodland at Mount Rainier, Washington, USA. Olympus EM5, ISO400, f/4.5. Handheld.

There is an often forgotten panel at the bottom of the development controls in Lightroom’s Develop module and that’s Camera Calibration. Here you can select the profile that’s used to convert the RAW file into an image. It sorts out how image data in the RAW maps to colours and tones in the finished image.

In the past I have written about how the profiles provided often aren’t that great and that you can achieve better by making your own. But now I have a new favourite profile for my Olympus EM5 camera and that is “Camera Natural”.

Camera Calibration tab in Lightroom with the Adobe Standard profile selected.
Camera Calibration tab in Lightroom with the Adobe Standard profile selected.

I can’t say for sure when this was introduced or when it was changed. I certainly can’t recall it giving good results in the past or perhaps I have just overlooked it. The changes it introduces are quite subtle but I think it creates a more natural (I suppose that’s where it gets its name) and appealing. The image at the top of the blog was created using the Camera Natural profile and below is a comparison. Looking at the images side by side it’s difficult to tell the difference but when your switching between profiles in Lightroom it’s like night and day.

Comparison of Profiles on the image
Comparison of Profiles on the image

As I say, subtle differences but well worth experimenting with if you shoot RAW and use Lightroom.