Tag Archives: architecture

Friday Image No.184

Genoa, Italy.
Genoa, Italy. Fuji X-T2, 18-135 lens. ISO400, 1/25″ at f/10.0.

Today is the world famous (at least in some circles) Saddleworth Band Contest. Some of you may recall the film “Brassed Off” where one of the scenes features the band visiting the contest but getting so drunk they could hardly play. Someone clearly did their research when writing the plot as there is a propensity for bands to pay particular attention to their hydration.

Unfortunately, today after what has seemed like a prolonged period (at least a week) of fabulous weather, the heavens have opened and it’s raining. Nothing unusual for Band Contest day.

As I sit writing this I can hear the first of bands playing so I guess it’s time to finish up and join my wife who’s helping at the check-in tent. I’m therefore going to leave you with another image from my Italy trip. This time it’s from Genoa where I happened to be passing an entrance and saw the image above. I think this is part of the university but I’m not sure.

I hope the weather is better where you are and that you have a great weekend.

Friday Image No.135

Stairs inside the Tate Gallery in St Ives. Sony RX10, ISO 200, f/5.6.

Last Friday I shared a simple image of a plant taken whilst on holiday in St Ives, a couple of years back. What this is really telling you is that I haven’t been taking many photographs recently and I’m now trawling through my archives. Unfortunately, the same is true this week and so I have returned to the same archive.

I know that my first love is the landscape but I also like architecture. This image was taken inside the Tate gallery in St Ives. Whilst everyone else was looking at the exhibits I was admiring the stairway. I did get plenty of odd looks but it’s worth it. I really like the clean lines and proportions.

Have a great weekend and I will see if I can’t shoot some images before next Friday.

A Note of Thanks

Canary Wharf in London's Docklands. Panasonic Lumix GM1 with 12-32mm lens. Post processing in Nik SIlver Efex Pro and Nik Analog Efex.
Canary Wharf in London’s Docklands. Panasonic Lumix GM1 with 12-32mm lens. Post processing in Nik SIlver Efex Pro and Nik Analog Efex.

I would like to publish a note of thanks to the security officers at Canary Wharf in London. Yesterday I visited London with a couple of friends as tourists to take pictures. One of our locations was Docklands with the intention of photographing some of the icon architecture including Canary Wharf.

Waiting for our friend outside the Tube Station we were taking some pictures of the buildings when we were approached by a security officer to ask if we had permission. What was nice about this is that the officer took the trouble to look at the pictures we were shooting and then contacted security to allow us to continue. It’s great when officials recognise that not everyone with a camera is a terrorist or pervert and treat people with respect.

Thank you.

Lightweight Approach to Architecture

Nantes Cathedral
Nantes Cathedral

It wasn’t that long ago that if you wanted to do architectural photography that you needed to be looking at cameras or lenses that would provide tilt and shift facilities. How the world has changed. Yes, correcting convergence and shift problems is better within the camera but it’s also very costly, especially when compared to the capabilities of Photoshop.

It’s now possible to shoot with your average camera and lens before correcting the problems in post production. It also becomes very easy to apply different levels of adjustment and experiment more. If you don’t get it right first time, just open up the image and apply some more adjustment using Photoshop’s Transform feature.

The image above was shot on the Olympus OMD using a 14-45mm Panasonic lens at 14mm focal length. The adjustments were applied using the Transform – Distort adjustment in Photoshop CS5. No visible softening of the image took place, even when viewed at 100% magnification on screen. The subsequent “artistic look” to add a vignette and soften the area outside the doorway was added using OnOne Perfect Photo Suite 7. The conversion to Black and White was made using Nik Silver Efex Pro. Most importantly, the amazing doorway is Nantes Cathedral in France.