Return of the RX10


La Rochelle, France. This is a 5 image sequence shot on the Sony RX10 and stitched in Lightroom. ISO80, f/5.6, 1/640″. Click the image to view a larger version of the file.

I previously commented on how my beloved RX10 was struck down by mould. This was on the front element of the lens and was inside a (supposedly) sealed unit. Rather than taking this to Sony for a repair I went to The Real Camera Company in Manchester. One of their engineers has now replaced the affected unit and the camera is back with me in a little over a week from my authorising the repair.

Whilst the camera has been away for repair it felt like I had lost something quite major. I had been used to taking the RX10 out on hikes across the moors where I live. The alternative was to take the Fuji X-T2 or Olympus EM5, both of which produce higher quality images than the RX10. Despite this, the inconvenience of never having the right lens on the camera at the point you want to use it, or needing to change lenses and filters frequently in the field was what can only be described as a pain in the butt.

The RX10 produces excellent detail and sharpness in the central area of the frame, but it softens near the edges and distorts a little in the corners (at the wide-angle end of the lens range). I suspect much of this is due to a lot of lens correction being applied in software. Despite this, the camera is a joy to use and produces images which have a lovely feel to them. The convenience of having a 24-200 focal length in a constant f2.8 lens, all bolted onto a 1” sensor is a great combination, especially when out walking.

So far, I have only taken a few test shots in the garden to check the camera functions correctly (it does.) I’m really looking forward to some good weather to put the RX10 through its paces. I would also like to say well done to The Real Camera company for their help and a job well done.

8 thoughts on “Return of the RX10

Add yours

  1. I’m glad you worked out your problems with the RX-10, Robin. I also have an original RX-10 and it has been a very good camera for me, my go-to, walk-about camera when I don’t want to use my big Canon D6, which is my landscape camera.
    I was also glad to hear you worked out the problem you had with your external hard drive formatted NTFS. I had a similar problem a few years ago when I was using the same external hd for both a Mac and PC. The Paragon software saved the day.
    I enjoyed your Friday image, the Bamburgh sunrise. Many thanks. Bob

    1. Thanks Bob. Yes, it is a great camera to use as a walkabout. I just wish the corners were sharper at the wide end of the focal range. Still, can’t have everything or they wouldn’t have anything new to tempt us with.

  2. Much appreciate this and your other entries on the RX10, which I have just re-read in the process of deciding whether or not to keep my RX10 mk1. I have tried to sort out whether it is my one camera does all for travel, or whether I should be content with my much older Leica V-lux 1 with a 1/1.7 sensor and twice the zoom and as far as I can judge better edge-to-edge sharpness, but less wide (only 35mm). Ultimately it’s not the last pixel of sharpness, but the overall feel of the images – and yours are very convincing, So it’s a hard struggle to decide.

      1. The problem is not money: I have both of them! Since the above entry, the RX10 has really grown on me – not least for marvellous mac work at the 200mm end! I use the wide end a good deal, too, which is a plus over the Leica. Both cameras are very agreeable in the hand, both produce quality images way above expectations, so they’re both staying!

      2. Hi John, I don’t blame you. I don’t think I could part with my RX10 now. Since I had it repaired, the results are superb. Much better than before. I haven’t done very much with the macro feature because I keep forgetting about it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: