Fuji RAW File Processing for Optimum Quality

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Test Image 2 at 100 percent
Test Image 2 at 100 percent magnification. Superb detail from a Fui RAW file.

In case you haven’t been following the story so far, allow me to recap. I decided it was time to replace my trusty Olympus EM5 and I was seduced by the great Fuji lenses and the promise of excellent image quality. I purchased a Fuji XT-1 and a couple of lenses only to find problems with the RAW files when I came to convert them – the images look as if they had been painted and lacked crisp details. Apparently this is a well-known problem.

I managed to improve the performance of the system by updating firmware. I also returned one of the lenses, replacing it with two others so that I have:

  • 10-24mm
  • 16-55mm
  • 55-200mm

The results from all of the lenses can be excellent which leads me to suspect lens quality is a factor in the problem. I have also chosen my words carefully here as I have seen the painterly effect with the 10-24mm when used at the longer end of the focal range.

Despite all these improvements, the single biggest factor seems to be the RAW converter used and this can have implications for all of us, even if you’re not a Fuji user. Let’s take a look at an example focussing just on the image quality.

What I want to see in my images is plenty of sharp, well defined fine detail as well as getting a feeling of texture in the image. What I don’t want to see is lots of noise.

The first thing I have noticed with the Fuji RAW files is that they are incredibly clean and don’t have much noise even when shooting at ISO 800 or 1600. In some cases, they seem unnaturally clean so I have started to shoot at ISO 400 and 800 regularly as I prefer the appearance.

Something else you may have read is that the JPEG files are great out of camera and are difficult to improve on. My experience of the JPEG’s is that they are indeed very good out of camera. But when processed well with a good RAW converter, you can easily exceed the results. With this in mind, let’s take a look at an example image.

Test Image
Test Image

OK, it’s not pretty but it was shot in good light and features the type of detail that people often complain isn’t rendered well by the Fuji. I have checked the image over and its sharp everywhere.

Here is a section from the JPEG out of the camera image at 100% magnification. You may need to click on this to view at full magnification.

JPEG File From Camera
JPEG File From Camera

What you see here is a screenshot of my screen which us 24” and running at 1920 x1080 pixels. This isn’t a very forgiving resolution but is great for sharpening and checking if things are in focus.

Let’s now compare this with the RAW file processed in Lightroom.

RAW Processed in Lightroom
RAW Processed in Lightroom

If this doesn’t look quite as sharp and detailed as the OOC JPEG image, I agree. This Lightroom rendering was also using all the tips I could find from the resources on the Internet that readers suggested as well as my own trial and error.

An improvement on Lightroom was Capture One which you can see below.

RAW Processed in Capture One
RAW Processed in Capture One

A word of warning with this image, it was produced using version 7 pro. I have tried to upgrade this but it just goes wrong with my Capture One 9 Sony only version. The results from version 9 may be better than the above. The RAW file converted in Capture One shows great colour and lots of contrast. The sharpness and detail are marginally better than Lightroom and probably on a par with the JPEGs. Some of the improvement may be contrast related.

Next we have Iridient which many people seem to swear by.

RAW Processed in Iridient
RAW Processed in Iridient

Apologies for the watermark but this is an evaluation version. The results are very promising and I may well spring for a copy of this. The detail is better than Capture One and the image looks very natural. It’s definitely better than the OOC JPEG.

Now for second place runner up and in fact, with some practice I might put this in the winning position but equally I might also relegate it to last spot.

RAW Processed in Affinity
RAW Processed in Affinity

This is sharper and more detailed than Iridient but much more difficult to control. I have actually over sharpened this image in the RAW converter. Part of the problem is that the image preview appears to have some form of blurring applied each time you make an adjustment but once you apply the conversion the blurring effect is removed. This may make it very difficult to handle but the results can be very good.

Now for the top spot in RAW converters for extracting fine detail and texture and one I recommend for all Fuji users and possibly other camera users as well.

RAW Processed in RAW Therapee
RAW Processed in RAW Therapee

This is from RAW Therapee. Yes, you read that correctly. It’s a free RAW converter and it really does blow away the competition with the Fuji RAW files. The OOC JPEG files don’t even come close to the detail that can be rendered by this application.

I repeated this testing with a number of files and the results are consistently good. Here is a second test image from the Fuji.

Test Image 2
Test Image 2

And a section of this at 100% magnification.

Test Image 2 at 100 percent
Test Image 2 at 100 percent

And if you don’t use Fuji, please still try this out as I had great results with the Olympus EM5. I suddenly realised how poor Lightroom was in comparison.

Now for the slight downside, the interface for RAW Therapee is pretty poor and the software crashes from time to time. There are that many options available that you probably need a PhD to get the optimum results. Despite this, it’s well worth the effort, especially if you have been plagued by the dreaded painter effect.

If you are wondering what happened to the fuji RAW converter from SilkyPix, I started to see quite a lot of artefacts in the tree detail so ruled this out. Equally, I didn’t like the lens distortion from Photo Ninja although the detail and sharpness was good. I have been a user of both of these software packages in the past and they may be worth taking a look at.

Finally, I will point out that the painter effect isn’t just as a result of the RAW converter. I’m finding it from time to time in all the RAW converters and in some of the JPEGs. I will post more about what I think is causing it once I have managed a little more research. But for now, RAW Therapee is producing great results.

I hope you found this useful. I’m off for a lie down.

4 thoughts on “Fuji RAW File Processing for Optimum Quality

    Cathy Murphy said:
    September 6, 2016 at 1:36 am

    Thanks for the interesting series. I shoot EM5ii and Canon. Will have to give Raw Therapee another look.

      thelightweightphotographer responded:
      September 6, 2016 at 7:27 pm

      It can be a litle tricky to understand but after a short while it becomes very quick to use and the results are worth the effort. I will be interested to hear how you find it with the RAW files from your cameras.

    Steve Pike said:
    September 6, 2016 at 10:01 pm

    Thanks for another interesting post.

    I am always on the lookout for a better raw processor but my personal experience has been that Lightroom can match the output of any of the alternative processors if the playing field is levelled. By this I mean that you need to achieve an exact match in colour rendition, contrast and exposure from each of them as much of the percieved sharpness in a photo comes from the variation in colour and brightness of adjacent pixels. Unfortunately your tests results in this article have not achieved matching colour balance, brightness and contrast and this affects our perception of the detail which can be achieved by each raw processor.

    Lightroom also requires extreme care in the use of the Sharpening panel as it can easily introduce artifacts. I have with care been able to match Lightroom to the results achieved with Iridient and Raw Therapee and I much prefer the user interface and cataloguing capabilities of Lightroom, so for now I have not been able to find a better tool for the job. I must agree though that Lightroom does not always do a good job with RAF files ‘out of the box’, the sharpening defaults and colour rendition in particular require tweaking.

      thelightweightphotographer responded:
      September 7, 2016 at 7:46 pm

      I agree Steve that the colour variations and contrast levels can play a part in our perception of sharpness and that I didn’t align these across the images. But I can judge when an image is sharp or not and I can also see the signs that the Lightroom Demosaic process is struggling to separate the detail. RAW Therapee has a dedicated Demosaic routine for XTrans which is the main difference. Having said that, the sharpening routines and denoise routines in RAW Therapee as well Iridient are very impressive. I will also agree with you that the standard sharpening settings in Lightroom are not very good for Fuji and need to be tweaked to emphasise detail. Despite these points, I stand by my findings that RAW Therapee is giving me noticeably better results than Lightroom. But I do remain open to learning a better way so I will be issuing a Fuji RAW conversion Challenge -watch this space.

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