Category Archives: Software

Installing Camera Profiles in Lightroom

Clappersgate Bridge, The Lake District. Olympus EM5 with Infrared Conversion.
Clappersgate Bridge, The Lake District. Olympus EM5 with Infrared Conversion.

My latest video is now live on You Tube. You can subscribe to my channel using the link below

https://www.youtube.com/user/rnwhalley/featured

or watch the video here (please note the video doesn’t show up in email, only on the blog).

If you’re a Lightroom user and aren’t familiar with changing your Camera Profile, be sure to watch this. There is a second part to this video which is coming soon and I doubt many people will have seen anything like it before.

The image you see above is the RAW file used in the video once it’s been fully processed.

B&W Conversion Video

You asked to see how it was done. Here is the video to explain. This shows how you can achieve quite dramatic black and white conversions using only Lightroom. You don’t need any other software or filters. What limits you is your imagination.

I hope you find this video useful and don’t forget to subscribe to my You Tube channel if you haven’t already.

Nik Silver Efex Video

Yesterday I published a new video on my You Tube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYMWL3WXU9QMeOUhD3lOpEw

This is one is another of those videos focussing on the overlooked adjustments. People often overlook some of the most powerful adjustments in favour of the most obvious. If you want to create some black and white conversions reminiscent of film, watch this short video.

I hope you enjoy.

New RAW Developer

Fuji XT1 Test image fully processed
Fuji XT1 Test image fully processed

Many of you reading this will be aware of my move to a Fuji XT1 and the concerns I had regarding the image quality. Now to be clear, it wasn’t that the image quality was bad but rather under certain circumstances fine detail was lost during the RAW conversion in Lightroom. Sometimes foliage would have an unusual appearance that was almost false.

In the following screenshot you can see a section of the above image at 100% magnification (you may need to double click the image to view it at full resolution). Whilst this isn’t a severe problem I don’t care for the detail in the image foliage as much as I do the results of other RAW processors I have now found.

Example 1 - click to see at 100%
Example 1 – click to see at 100%

Since encountering this I have been experimenting with a number of RAW converters including RAW Therapee and Iridient. I am very impressed with both of these as RAW converters but they lack some of the tools of Lightroom and/or are a little trickier to use. RAW Therapee for example has a very large selection of tools in an interface that’s hard to grasp initially.

In the following image you can see the same image processed with Iridient, also at 100% magnification. Although lacking in midtone contrast, the image is more natural in appearance and there is greater detail in the foliage.

Example 2 - click to see at 100%
Example 2 – click to see at 100%

And here is the RAW Therapee conversion at 100%.

Example 3 - click to see at 100%
Example 3 – click to see at 100%

Again, this has more detail and is sharper than the Adobe version but also looks more natural. I also prefer it to the Iridient version if I’m honest.

I have now come across another RAW converter that clearly has parallels with Lightroom, even offering some of the same functionality. Although it’s not as easy to use or quite as well designed as Lightroom, it does seem to produce images with excellent levels of detail and sharpness. This is also true when processing XTrans RAW files and so may be another alternative for people who want an alternative to Adobe. Best of all the software is Free and the enthusiasts behind this project are to be commended. The only potential downside is that it’s not available on the Windows platform but if you use a Mac, you really should take a look at the software.

Here is a section of the image at 100% (I apologise for not matching the colour and contrast but I haven’t yet mastered the processing).

Example 4 - click to see at 100%
Example 4 – click to see at 100%

The name of the software is Darktable.

http://www.darktable.org/

 

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Fuji XTrans III RAW Files

In my most recent blog posting I shared my thoughts about the Fuji XT1 and at the end, mentioned my intention to upgrade to the XT2 once available in the UK. Following this a few people contacted me to ask if I had considered the XPro2 and in one case, someone offered to share with me sample RAW files from their XPro2.

To answer the question, have I considered the XPro2, the answer is yes I have. Personally I find the camera body a little wide and I don’t like the handling anywhere near as much as the XT1. I’m therefore prepared to wait until I can get the XT2. I don’t need to urgently change my camera and getting something that I can love and work with for a number of years is much more important to me than just changing the camera to improve the technical spec.

Now for the interesting part and for which I have to thank Nick Harvey-Phillips for sharing some RAW files from the XPro2. All the images on this page are provided by Nick as test sample and he retains copyright. The reason XPro2 RAW files are helpful is that the same sensor is being used in the XT2.

The first thing I noticed on opening the image below is the very high image quality.

Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips
Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips

In the next shot you can see a section of the train at 100% magnification.

Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips. Section at 100% magnification
Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips. Section at 100% magnification

This is a 25Mpixel sensor giving a large image at 6,000 x 4,000 pixels. The images appear to be very well defined and sharp. The detail in the objects is very sharp but then it always was in the XT1 which uses the previous generation of the sensor with a lower 16Mpixel count. Clearly, Fuji has been able to maintain the good performance here so let’s take a look at the problem area of fine detail in grass and foliage, which often gives rise to a water colour effect.

As I have mentioned previously the water colour effect tends to be more obvious on screens where there is a lower pixel density. For this reason, I am doing the assessment on a 24” screen which is 1920 x 1080 pixels. When I look at the images on the 27” Mac running a 5K display I see perfection.

The other factor which seems to cause or emphasise the water colour effect is the RAW converter. Here Adobe converters seem to have problems so I used the latest version of Lightroom (CC 15.7). When I review the images in Lightroom at 100% I see a much better result than I expected. The “false” water colour effect/pattern is largely gone and you need to look extremely closely into small areas to find any trace of this.

Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips
Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips

This is the full image with only modest adjustment to the exposure, contrast and sharpening for the purposes of the comparison. In the next shot below you can see a section of the image magnified to 100% with an area of the grass which exhibits traces of the water colour effect. In all honesty, if you didn’t know what you were looking for I think you would miss it.

Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips. Section from the Lightroom conversion at 100% magnification
Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips. Section from the Lightroom conversion at 100% magnification

To provide a comparison I processed the image using the Iridient RAW converter. Here the “false” effect isn’t really detected (although I did over-sharpen the image for the lower resolution monitor). The image is also lacking some of the mid tone contrast present in the Lightroom conversion.

Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips. Section at 100% magnification from the Iridient conversion.
Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips. Section at 100% magnification from the Iridient conversion.

Overall, the images coming out of the new sensor are excellent. They actually reminded me a little of the RAW file images from the Olympus EM5 except they are much larger and more flexible.

Now, when you compare the images from Lightroom and Iridient side by side, you can still see the Iridient images have more fine detail and Lightroom version is a little soft.

For the Lightroom images I used the settings

Amount = 36

Radius = 0.6

Detail = 57

Threshold = 10

I also had the Colour and Luminance noise reduction set to 0.

I recalled though that one of the comments from the “Fuji RAW Conversion Challenge” I issued said that you needed Deconvolution sharpening to bring out the best in the XTrans sensor. I therefore thought that I would apply a second pass of sharpening to the Lightroom file using Nik Sharpener Pro RAW sharpener (available free from Google). What a difference.

Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips. Lightroom conversion at 100% following sharpening with Nik Sharpener Pro.
Image Courtesy of Nick Harvey-Phillips. Lightroom conversion at 100% following sharpening with Nik Sharpener Pro.

The results now match those from Iridient in many areas of the image. Attempting the same with the Iridient file didn’t produce much of an improvement. Next step is to try this experiment with some of the XT1 file I have.

Lightroom Video Published

It appears that quite a number of you want to know more about working with Lightroom and what tips might help save you some time. With this in mind I put together this short 10-minute video demonstrating a few points including History, Snapshots and Integration with Photoshop. These may not be the most exciting features but they could save you a lot of time. Probably much more than the 10 minutes it takes to watch the video.

As always, requests for future video topics are gratefully received.

New Nik Color Efex Video Post

If you have been following my series of video posts on the Essential Landscape filters found in the Nik Color Efex software, I have uploaded the fourth in the series. This is possibly the last of these so if anyone has a particular request relating to Nik filters or other aspects of image editing let me know and I will add this to the list for future videos.

If you haven’t already visited my You Tube channel the link is below:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYMWL3WXU9QMeOUhD3lOpEw

I hope you enjoy.