What a great group of people you are

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Doorway in Potasi, Bolivia
Doorway in Potasi, Bolivia

I just wanted to post a quick note to say thank you for all your messages of support. After my problems with the Lenscraft site migration yesterday and my follow up email today, I have been inundated with replies. It appears I am forgiven (thank you) and that the consensus opinion is that you like the new website.

I’m now feeling much better about events so thank you. I also thought I would share this door image from my Bolivia trip (I managed to shoot hundreds of these).

Website woes

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Cloud over the salt flats at uyuni, bolivia
Cloud over the salt flats at uyuni, bolivia

Today, as with yesterday I have spent the day trying to migrate my Lenscraft site to WordPress. The easy part was building the site. The difficult part has been trying to migrate almost 3,000 user accounts over to the new site.

Actually that wasn’t the hard part. The hard part has been trying to notify people of the move. I thought I would be helpful and include peoples user names in the email I sent out. My email software had other ideas and has replaced some peoples (not everyone’s) user name with the word “Yes”. You can imagine the confusion this is causing and I’m frantically trying to email people as they raise a query. So if you are affected, please continue to use your original user name that you registered.

To cheer me up I thought I would share another Bolivia image. This time it’s of a cloud over the salt flats. I like the shadow it casts.

I hope tomorrow is a better day.

Back from Bolivia

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Hostle Courtyard, Potasi, Bolivia
Hostle Courtyard, Potasi, Bolivia

I’m back from my recent break and want to apologise for the absence of posts over the past two weeks. The main reason for the break was that I have been trekking in Bolivia (everyone deserves a holiday some time) and there just wasn’t any internet access.

Secondly I have been working on migrating my Lenscraft website to the WordPress platform in order to make it more user friendly. This should go live over the next 24 hours if all goes well. You can also look forward to a few images of the Bolivia over the coming weeks. For now the image above is of a courtyard from one of the hostels I used.

Friday image No.037

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Nikon D800, 18-35 Nikkor lens, f/16.0 for 0.625" at ISO100
Penmon Lighthouse. Nikon D800, 18-35 Nikkor lens, f/16.0 for 0.625″ at ISO100

Here’s a recent one from the Nikon D800. After a few trips I finally seem to be working better with the D800 and more of my images are in focus and sharp. I’m shooting with the camera set to 14bit mode rather than the usual 12bit and the colours seem to be responding well during the RAW file conversions. I will of course have more to say in the near future on the D800 and will be comparing it to the Olympus EM5 and Sony RX10.

Now over the next couple of weeks I’m going to go a little silent on you all and won’t be posting. I need to dedicate some time to getting the new Lenscraft website up and running. I hope to have this finished by the end of October but I need to spend some dedicated time. This isn’t just a new website but an entire move of platform.

I hope you like the image, have a great weekend and I’ll be back online around the end of the month.

Comparing the Nikon D800

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Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35 lens at f/14 for 15 seconds. Lee 10 stop ND filter.
Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35 lens at f/14 for 15 seconds. Lee 10 stop ND filter.

I would like to start this blog post with an apology. It’s taken me far too long to publish my first thoughts about the D800 and how it compares to the Olympus EM5. But there is a reason for this in that I have wanted to get used to the D800 given that it’s a new camera. It usually takes me a number of outings to begin to understand a camera and then quite a few more to start producing work that I am pleased with.

I have now had exactly three outings with the D800 and I feel that I am starting to understand it and get “the feel of the camera”. Despite this I c

an’t keep you all waiting any longer so I will start to discuss my findings. First though I should outline the equipment that I have been using and the technique I have adopted when using the D800.

As you may be aware I purchased the D800 used as it was an absolute bargain. I also purchased two lenses to use with the camera:

  • Nikkor 24-85 f/2.8-4D IF
  • Nikkor 18-35 f3.5-4.5G ED

Neither of these lenses are the top rated in their category but they are more reasonably priced than the pro lenses. Price wise they compare with the lenses I use on my Olympus EM5 for similar focal lengths although the 12-40mm Olympus is a little more costly than the Nikkor 24-85. Of the two Nikkor lenses the 18-35 is sharper and produces better results although you do need to be peeping at those pixels in 100% magnification to notice.

In terms of using the D800, I have been shooting almost entirely with the camera mounted on a heavy Manfrotto 055CL which is one hell of a sturdy and robust tripod. I have also been using a cable release to minimise vibration. When shooting landscapes I have been using 100mm Lee ND Grad filters.

My mode of operation with the D800 on the tripod is to shoot in Live View and with the lens set to manual focus. Using this I will select the point of focus, zoom in to 100% magnification then focus the lens manually. I have found this will provide a better and more reliable result than relying on the camera’s auto focus system. A couple of observations I would make here are:

  • You need to use Live View in order to gain the flexibility of the focus point positioning. Only in live view can you position this anywhere in the frame. If you are using the optical viewfinder you will be limited by the cameras autofocus points. This is rather annoying as these points don’t extend sufficiently into the frame to obtain the best focussing.
  • When shooting in this way you need to remember to close the rear curtain on the viewfinder or you will get exposure problems as you can see from the image here. The light leak look is quite appealing but I don’t want it on every frame.
Nikon D800 showing light leak caused by not closing the rear curtain on the viewfinder
Nikon D800 showing light leak caused by not closing the rear curtain on the viewfinder

So now you know a little about how I am working with the D800, my next post on the subject will start to compare some of the factors such as image quality. I would also like to make this quite interactive so if anyone reading this has a comparison characteristic they would like to know about, just ask.

As a parting comment, I would like to point out that the EM5 is far more forgiving as a camera than the D800. I can use it hand held at ridiculously slow shutter speeds and still achieve a very sharp image. I can also work with it in very flexible and creative ways where with the D800 I am fighting with the tripod for most of the time. This has cut my shooting rate to about 1/10 of the EM5.

The Bleak Weather Returns

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Sony RX10 - ISO80, 1/80" at f/5.6. 2 stop ND Grad filter on the sky.
Sony RX10 – ISO80, 1/80″ at f/5.6. 2 stop ND Grad filter on the sky.

I was out walking yesterday in the Lakes – what a mistake. The weather was dreadful. It was windy, foggy and the rain was driving down hard. Despite this I managed to pull out the Sony RX10 and rattled off a few frames. I quite like the one above as I think it conveys well just how poor the weather was.

New Website Call

I’m also going to be taking some time out shortly to build my new Lenscraft website. I know that quite a few people who read the Lightweight Photography blog are members of Lenscraft so I would like to publicise an offer. If you are a Lenscraft member, have your own website and would like me to add a link in the “Members Sites” section, email your details to me at robin@lenscraft.co.uk. I just need your name and a link to your site. Obviously feel free to return the link but there is no requirement.

Friday image No.036

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RWhalley_5D_2011_IMG_1252_50_18_2.5

Isn’t it strange how your taste in photography seems to change. I shot this image just over three years ago. I recall considering this a poor trip at the time as I didn’t really come back with any “high octane” dramatic shots. What I did get was quite a lot of nice, tranquil scenes which I relegated to a folder on my hard drive and promptly forgot about.

Last week I was clearing out some images in order to start work on my new website (coming soon). That’s when I saw this image and wondered why I hadn’t bothered very much with it. Now that I look at it, I really like the scene and the colours.

I hope you like it and have a great weekend.