Friday Image No.60

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Llyn Peninsula, North Wales. Olympus EM5, 12-40mm lens at 12mm. ISO200, f/8, 8.8", Lee 10 stop filter.
Llyn Peninsula, North Wales. Olympus EM5, 12-40mm lens at 12mm. ISO200, f/8, 8.8″, Lee 10 stop filter.

It’s been a very long week again. Most of my free time was taken up with repairing the damage done to the Lenscraft site and dealing with errors in Google so I apologise for not posting anything of interest this past week. Hopefully after this weekend I can get back to normal and start posting and adding tutorials again.

Despite this, I found a little time to search through my archives and find another image from my trip to North Wales last year. This was taken on the same morning (but a little earlier) as last week’s Friday Image. I quite like the painterly quality of the light.

Have a great weekend everyone.

Lenscraft is Back

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I just managed to get the Lenscraft site back on line. I will post more when I have time.

Thanks for your patience.

Robin

Yet More Website Issues

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I’m sorry to announce that the Lenscraft website is down again for the 3rd time in 6 months. I decided to sign up for the CloudFlare service (through my hosting company) and almost immediately Lenscraft went offline. Not only is the Lenscraft site down I also can’t get into the admin side to try to fix it. The support team tried to help but haven’t been succesfull and said they don’t know what else to do. I have tried deleting the site and recovering it from backups taken when it was known to work but they suffer the same problems. I am now searching for a new hosting company so the site may be down for a few days whilst I try to sort this out.

Apologies for the inconvenience.

Robin

Friday Image No. 59

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Olympus EM5, ISO400, f/7.1, 4 seconds, Lee 10 stop filter.
Olympus EM5, ISO400, f/7.1, 4 seconds, Lee 10 stop filter.

The clean-up of my image library backlog continues and I suspect it will be ongoing for some time. I worked out recently that I have nearly 300,000 images in the backlog – that’s going to take some time to work through.

On a positive note I am certainly getting the desired distance (in time) from the original shoot and this is allowing me to pick out some new images that I initially overlooked. This particular image is one from a Trip I made to the Llyn Peninsula in North Wales last November. At the time I didn’t recall shooting much that I was happy with. I had become fixated with trying to use the Nikon D800 (purchased as an experiment and sold soon after in frustration) but was fighting with it. I was also fighting back the pain from a prolapsed disk in my Neck but at the time didn’t realise the severity of the problem. In all, it was a memorable trip for all the wrong reasons.

Now that I’m looking back at the images I realised that I shot many more with the Olympus EM5 than the Nikon D800 and that there are some real gems in there.

Hope you like the image and have a great weekend.

Lightroom Panorama Tool Tip

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Six image stitch using a Canon G16 creates a 26" x 14" image at 300dpi.
Six image stitch using a Canon G16 creates a 26″ x 14″ image at 300dpi.

I am fast becoming a fan of the new Photo Merge to Panorama feature in Lightroom 6 (Creative Cloud). I can use the Stacking feature to easily group the photos in a panorama series so that I don’t mix them up with single images. I can then create the new merged panorama as a DNG file ready to be processed like any other RAW file. Once I have the merged DNG I can add it to the top of the image Stack and then collapse the stack. What I then see in Lightroom is the Panorama files and if I want to repeat the merge process I can expand the Stack to see the individual image files.

Here you can see the area the auto crop tool has selected
Here you can see the area the auto crop tool has selected

One aspect of the new feature that I am starting to change my mind about is the Auto Merge and Auto Crop checkbox. The Auto Merge feature automatically selects the blending mode but most often picks the mode that results in a long thin image. Often picking one of the other blending modes will give a file which has more height which tends to be useful.

Similarly the Auto Crop tool will take out the area where the image doesn’t cover the entire canvas. Whilst this can be helpful it can also restrict the size of the image. I have now begun to find that I am turning off the crop to check.

Here is the image in Photoshop with the crop removed.
Here is the image in Photoshop with the crop removed.

Where there isn’t much cropping required I now prefer to take the image into Photoshop once blended. In Photoshop I then duplicate the layer and use the “Edit | Transform | Warp” menu command to warp the duplicate layer. This allows the image to be stretched over the entire canvas without a reduction in size. The only real downside to this is that the edges of the scene can become a little distorted but with landscape images this is very difficult to detect.

If you also use the new merge feature give this technique a try and let me know what you think.

Friday image No. 58

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Three image stich of Helm Crag with approaching snow storm. Canon G16.
Three image stich of Helm Crag with approaching snow storm. Canon G16.

Recently I have begun the task (albeit slowly) of cleaning up my Lightroom Catalogues. I have loads of rubbish in there and all these images are beginning to weigh on my conscience. Some people do this clean up activity almost as soon as they have downloaded the images to their computer but this doesn’t seem to work for me. I find I need some space between the shoot and the review, in fact I often find I need 6 months before I can appreciate some of the images.

If I try to do this exercise too soon I find that I delete images that have a subtle appeal and quite often grow on you. I also find that I keep the images that are high impact, which are the ones I frequently tire of quickly.

I’m currently working through my Canon G16 files from a shoot on Helm Crag that I did in winter. I’m now finding that I really like some of the images that I shot including this one. I’m also finding that the new Photo Merge feature in Lightroom CC a real bonus as it’s encouraging me to group each series of Panorama images into Stacks. I can then quickly produce a merged Panorama and include it with the Stack. It’s really helping my review process.

I hope you like the image and have a great weekend.

Topaz Adjust 40% Discount

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Bolivia Volcano sunset. Processed with Topaz Adjust.
Bolivia Volcano sunset. Processed with Topaz Adjust.

I have just received word that Topaz are running a 40% discount on their popular Adjust software starting 16th July and running through to the end of the month. The discount code for anyone who is interested is JULYADJUST.

This brings the price down to $29.99 which is an absolute bargain if you don’t already have the software. It provides a great set of all round adjustments for the photographer and I have been a long time user. I really like the Topaz policy of upgrades for life and think this is the right way to treat the customer.

I thought I would share the above image which was processed using Adjust. The original image of the volcano, although shot near to sunset was lacking the contrast and colours that I remembered. You can see this below although do keep in mind that the image is exposed to the right.

Bolivia Volcano before adjustment
Bolivia Volcano before adjustment

Happy image editing.