Tag Archives: Lake District

Friday Image No.199


Langdale Valley, The Lake District, Cumbria
Langdale Valley, The Lake District, Cumbria. Nikon D800, 24-120mm lens at 35mm. ISO100, 1/10″ at f/18.0. Kase Wolverine 0.6 ND Grad, Polarising Filter. Tripod Mounted.

Did all you Fuji users see it?

Phase One released a version of Capture One exclusively for the Fuji. You won’t though be able to use it with all your RAW files unless you upgrade to the full version. Never the less, this is an excellent piece of software and best of all, it’s free.

If you missed the announcement, here’s a link to the webpage.

https://www.phaseone.com/en/Capture-One/Capture-One-Fujifilm.aspx

I’ve been trying out the software on my Mac and I’m very impressed by the results. Yesterday I posted a video to Youtube comparing RAW Converters when processing Fuji RAW files

I’ll definitely be including Capture One in a future comparison.

Now I also need to make you aware that I’m not going to be posting updates to this blog for the next couple of months due to other commitments. I’m still contactable by email and will respond to comments where possible, I just won’t be posting new images for a few weeks. Hopefully you will still be around once I’m able to restart activities.

Until then, here is the final Friday Image. I hope you enjoy it and have a great weekend.

Friday Image No.197


Wastwater, The Lake District.
Wastwater, The Lake District. Canon 5D MKII, 24-105L lens, IS)50, 1/10″ at f/16.0. Handheld.

For this week’s Friday image, I’ve decided to share an image I shot back in March 2010. Yes, it’s taken me just over 8 years to get around to processing this one. But that’s not the reason I want to share it.

When I shot this image, I realised there was a good composition and a nice scene. But when I tried to process it originally, it just didn’t work. I couldn’t make the image match what was in my mind at the time I shot it. To show you what I mean, here’s the original so you can see.

Starting image prior to correction

Each time I tried to process this it fell short of what I wanted to achieve so it’s sat on my hard drive since. Only now did I decide to edit the image again. Fortunately, my skills and the software have moved on and I quite like the result.

The reason I wanted to share the starting image is to show what you can achieve with a few relatively simple but careful adjustments. We no longer create great photography in the camera. The camera is only the start of the process. Image editing helps us develop the image and take it to a new level.

But we don’t create great photography in software either. We create great photography in our mind.

Future Blog Posts and Sharpening Tutorial


Wasterwater, The Lake District (2012)
Wastwater, The Lake District (2012). Canon 5D MKII, 24-105 lens, ISO100, 1/15″ at f/14.0. Handheld.

I haven’t posted much on the blog in the past couple of weeks. I’m quite short of time at present and the blog’s unfortunately taken second place to other important activities. I’m therefore going to change the direction of the blog a little. I suppose this goes back to my post at the end of last year when I was pondering its future.

Rather than trying to write educational articles, those will just appear on my Lenscraft website. The blogs going to be about sharing news and other articles, as well of course my photographs. You can think of it as a type of hub for my other work and news, which is more in line with what people might expect of a blog. I hope you still enjoy and find this helpful.

Now that I’ve sorted that, have you seen my latest Nik Sharpening videos?

I’ve posted two of these to YouTube recently and they appear to be going down very well with people. The first video covers Capture sharpening using Nik Sharpener Pro (RAW Presharpener). The other covers Creative and Output sharpening, this time with Nik Sharpener Pro (Output Sharpener).

In the videos I demonstrate sharpening the image on this page. I’ve since produced a large print of this and I’m very impressed with the results. The sky and water are perfectly clear and free from any visible noise or artefacts. At the same time, so much detail has become evident in the branches of the trees and the look like they are jumping out of the surface of the print.

My next video’s scheduled for Thursday 13th September at 15:30 (UK time). This one is discussing installing Lightroom Presets as there’s big problem. A lot of people are having difficulty installing these since Adobe changed the format and location of the presets. The old “recommended” method of installing presets doesn’t work with Lightroom version 7.3 or later. In the video I explain why and what to do instead.

I hope you enjoy these.

Friday Image No.193


Steam at Seatoller, The Lake District.
Steam at Seatoller, The Lake District. Fuji X-T2, 16-55mm lens, ISO100, 2.3″ at f/11.0.

Last weekend I headed up to the Lake District with my friend Steve. This trip was a little different as we were going to meet up with our friend Ed who we hadn’t seen for four years. To mark the occasion, we decided to explore some new areas around Derwent Water that we might not usually visit. The image here is from one of those.

The weather wasn’t kind to us (I blame Ed as the weather is his line of work) and it rained for much of the day. We decided to shoot near to Honister Pass to explore some woodland that Steve and I had seen previously but were unable to stop the car. This time we found where to park and were able to scramble down to the river.

Initially, I had thought this was going to be black and white shot, but I now like the colour conversion. I have done very little to this image other than applying a Kodak Ektar film simulation in Alien Skin Exposure X3. After that, I added a vignette and positioned the centre of this in the lower third of the frame.

I hope you like the image and have a great weekend.

Friday Image No.191


Walla Crag, The Lake District, Cumbria.
Walla Crag, The Lake District, Cumbria. Fuji X-T2, 18-135mm lens, ISO200, 1/110″ at f/11.0.

It’s been some time since it’s rained here properly. The last time was back on the 25th May. I remember it well because it was the Saddleworth Band Contest and that was the first time it had rained in weeks.

Yesterday morning we had a brief shower and last night we had heavier rain. It will be a long time though before the reservoirs are back to regular levels. It’s brought back memories of the Summery of 1976.

But sat here today looking out on the rain, I thought I would share this summery scene to bring back the memories of summer. I do believe it’s forecast to improve again soon though.

Have a great weekend.

The Drobo is Back


Newlands Valley, The Lake District.
Newlands Valley, The Lake District. Fuji X-T2, 18-135 lens, ISO200, 1/220″ at f/10.0. Post processing in Nik Silver Efex Pro.

After all my recent problems the Drobo is now back up and running. BUT, it only using three disks and not four.

In my previous post on the subject I mentioned that I had to return one of the replacement 3TB drives that had failed. To replace that drive, I ordered a new 4TB from Amazon. When this drive arrived, I tried to add it to the Drobo, but it didn’t seem to fit. It was actually loose in the drive bay.

After some head scratching as to the problem, I compared the drive to one of the old drives and realised it wasn’t as high. It wasn’t the standard size for a 3.5” disk drive. Checking Amazon there was nothing to indicate the unusual size but looking at the physical dimensions of the drive it listed the height as 2cm. Checking other 3.5” drives I realised they were all listed as 2.7cm.

So be warned, if you’re buying additional drives for your Drobo or NAS, check the height of the drive. There are now slimline disks on the market and they don’t fit standard drive bays.

I will pick up a fourth drive at some point, but I just wanted to get the Drobo up and running. I have now copied my backup onto the Drobo and recovered as many images as possible from my formatted memory cards. I’m missing a couple of hundred images but more annoyingly a lot of video I shot for a future YouTube posting. At least the bulk of my images are safe though and I hope you like this one.

Friday Image No.190


View down to Honister Pass from Dale Head, Lake District, Cumbria, UK.
View down to Honister Pass from Dale Head, Lake District. Fuji X-T2, Fuji 18-135 lens, ISO200, f/11.0, 1/125″.

If you know the Lake District, you will know there are a few amazing passes to drive:

  • Wrynose/Hardknott
  • Kirkstone
  • Honister

Whilst these passes are spectacular, you might not realise the best view is often above you.

The image here is looking down onto Honister Pass from the summit of Dale Head (753m). It doesn’t sound much but it can be a bit of a slog when you have walked around the other hills in the Newlands Horseshoe. You can see the road and the river running in parallel along the valley and in the distance is Buttermere.

Despite having walked the rout several times, this is one of the best views I have experienced. In the past it’s often been foggy or raining hard with poor visibility.

Initially I thought this would be a colour shot but then I tried the black and white conversion and thought, that’s the one. In case you’re interested, here is the colour version.

View down to Honister Pass from Dale Head, Lake District.
Colour version of the image.

Have a great weekend.

PS My Lenscraft July newsletter is out tomorrow.