Tag Archives: Lake District

I Almost Didn’t Shoot This

Derwentwater near to sunset. Keswick, the Lake District. Fuji X-T3 and Fuji 16-80 lens.

At the time I didn’t think this image would work. I was certain the conditions were too bright, and the dynamic range of the scene was too high. These were just a couple of the challenges that almost made me not bother taking the image. In the end, I decided to just take the shot and see what I could make of it in post-processing. Boy am I pleased that I did.

If you want to read more about what I learned and see the starting image, you can read about it in my November newsletter. The newsletter goes out overnight tonight. If you don’t already receive this, you can subscribe here

https://lenscraft.co.uk/lenscraft-photography-blog/photography-newsletter/

You’ll also be able to read my November newsletter after the 2nd of November on this page.

The image is of Derwentwater in the Lake District, taken near to the landing stage for the boats at Keswick. I used my Fuji X-T3 with the new Fuji 16-60 lens. I shot this handheld and without filters at ISO160 (the base ISO for the Fuji X-T3). This gave a shutter speed of 1/280” at f/11.0.

Post capture processing was in Capture One for the RAW conversion which allowed me to do a lot of the shadow and highlight recovery. I then used Nik Viveza to improve the light after which I softened the image with a faint blur to the highlights.

Have a great weekend.

Friday Image No.208

Walking between Elterwater and Little Langdale in the Lake District, I noticed this group of trees. See the text below for details of the image capture.

In case you haven’t seen it, last week’s Friday Image wasn’t all it appears. The starting image wasn’t quite as colourful as the image I posted. In fact, it was rather a dull blue colour because of the AWB in the camera. This was a bit of a problem for me as was the dynamic range of the scene. The reason I’m telling you this is that I posted a video on YouTube yesterday where I demonstrate how I created the image. It’s around 30 minutes long, but that’s because I show and explain everything.

This week, I want to share a more traditional image. This one I captured during a recent trip to the Lake District and is from one of the fields above Elterwater. If you know your way onto Loughrigg Terrance from the cycle track between Elterwater and Little Langdale, you know where I shot this.

My original idea was for a three-shot panoramic which I did capture, and which does look good. But then I noticed this cluster of trees and a couple of sheep in the field beyond. The grass on the grass on the right was a lovely red colour and snowy foreground on the left nicely balanced the mountain behind.

The image is a single frame captured using the Fuji X-T2 and Fuji 18-135 lens. This is now my go to lens when I’m out walking as it’s a real all rounder and performs well. I also used a 0.6 (two stop) ND Grad filter to darken the sky and open the shadows more around the trees. With a bit of luck, I’m going to be up in the Lakes again on Saturday.

I hope you like the image and have a great weekend.

Friday Image No.207

Tarn Hows Winter Sun in the Lake District.
Tarn Hows Winter Sun in the English Lake District. Fuji X-T2 with Fuji 18-135mm lens, various shutter speeds (see text), hand held.

It’s been a hectic week here, with four back to back days of photography. I can’t recall the last time this happened, but I wasn’t going to miss the opportunity.

The first day was a trip over to the Peak District to meet up with a friend. That almost didn’t happen because the Snake Pass (which is my usual route) was closed by snow and ice. Fortunately, I had the idea of driving down to Winnats Pass which I reasoned was more likely to be clear. When I did arrive, there was snow and fog everywhere, making for some amazing scenes.

Following this, it was over the Lake District for three more days enjoying the Landscape, as well as more fog and snow. The image you see here is from the Sunday at Tarn Hows. It’s five exposures which I’ve blended into a single image as the composition just didn’t allow me to use an ND Grad.

I captured the images with my Fuji X-T2 and 18-135mm Fuji lens hand held. Fortunately, the bracketing option on the Fuji means you only need to press the shutter button once to take all the images in the sequence. This allows you to concentrate on holding the camera steady for all the shots.

I hope you like the image and have a great weekend.

Friday Image No.199

Langdale Valley, The Lake District, Cumbria
Langdale Valley, The Lake District, Cumbria. Nikon D800, 24-120mm lens at 35mm. ISO100, 1/10″ at f/18.0. Kase Wolverine 0.6 ND Grad, Polarising Filter. Tripod Mounted.

Did all you Fuji users see it?

Phase One released a version of Capture One exclusively for the Fuji. You won’t though be able to use it with all your RAW files unless you upgrade to the full version. Never the less, this is an excellent piece of software and best of all, it’s free.

If you missed the announcement, here’s a link to the webpage.

https://www.phaseone.com/en/Capture-One/Capture-One-Fujifilm.aspx

I’ve been trying out the software on my Mac and I’m very impressed by the results. Yesterday I posted a video to Youtube comparing RAW Converters when processing Fuji RAW files

I’ll definitely be including Capture One in a future comparison.

Now I also need to make you aware that I’m not going to be posting updates to this blog for the next couple of months due to other commitments. I’m still contactable by email and will respond to comments where possible, I just won’t be posting new images for a few weeks. Hopefully you will still be around once I’m able to restart activities.

Until then, here is the final Friday Image. I hope you enjoy it and have a great weekend.

Friday Image No.197

Wastwater, The Lake District.
Wastwater, The Lake District. Canon 5D MKII, 24-105L lens, IS)50, 1/10″ at f/16.0. Handheld.

For this week’s Friday image, I’ve decided to share an image I shot back in March 2010. Yes, it’s taken me just over 8 years to get around to processing this one. But that’s not the reason I want to share it.

When I shot this image, I realised there was a good composition and a nice scene. But when I tried to process it originally, it just didn’t work. I couldn’t make the image match what was in my mind at the time I shot it. To show you what I mean, here’s the original so you can see.

Starting image prior to correction

Each time I tried to process this it fell short of what I wanted to achieve so it’s sat on my hard drive since. Only now did I decide to edit the image again. Fortunately, my skills and the software have moved on and I quite like the result.

The reason I wanted to share the starting image is to show what you can achieve with a few relatively simple but careful adjustments. We no longer create great photography in the camera. The camera is only the start of the process. Image editing helps us develop the image and take it to a new level.

But we don’t create great photography in software either. We create great photography in our mind.

Future Blog Posts and Sharpening Tutorial

Wasterwater, The Lake District (2012)
Wastwater, The Lake District (2012). Canon 5D MKII, 24-105 lens, ISO100, 1/15″ at f/14.0. Handheld.

I haven’t posted much on the blog in the past couple of weeks. I’m quite short of time at present and the blog’s unfortunately taken second place to other important activities. I’m therefore going to change the direction of the blog a little. I suppose this goes back to my post at the end of last year when I was pondering its future.

Rather than trying to write educational articles, those will just appear on my Lenscraft website. The blogs going to be about sharing news and other articles, as well of course my photographs. You can think of it as a type of hub for my other work and news, which is more in line with what people might expect of a blog. I hope you still enjoy and find this helpful.

Now that I’ve sorted that, have you seen my latest Nik Sharpening videos?

I’ve posted two of these to YouTube recently and they appear to be going down very well with people. The first video covers Capture sharpening using Nik Sharpener Pro (RAW Presharpener). The other covers Creative and Output sharpening, this time with Nik Sharpener Pro (Output Sharpener).

In the videos I demonstrate sharpening the image on this page. I’ve since produced a large print of this and I’m very impressed with the results. The sky and water are perfectly clear and free from any visible noise or artefacts. At the same time, so much detail has become evident in the branches of the trees and the look like they are jumping out of the surface of the print.

My next video’s scheduled for Thursday 13th September at 15:30 (UK time). This one is discussing installing Lightroom Presets as there’s big problem. A lot of people are having difficulty installing these since Adobe changed the format and location of the presets. The old “recommended” method of installing presets doesn’t work with Lightroom version 7.3 or later. In the video I explain why and what to do instead.

I hope you enjoy these.

Friday Image No.193

Steam at Seatoller, The Lake District.
Steam at Seatoller, The Lake District. Fuji X-T2, 16-55mm lens, ISO100, 2.3″ at f/11.0.

Last weekend I headed up to the Lake District with my friend Steve. This trip was a little different as we were going to meet up with our friend Ed who we hadn’t seen for four years. To mark the occasion, we decided to explore some new areas around Derwent Water that we might not usually visit. The image here is from one of those.

The weather wasn’t kind to us (I blame Ed as the weather is his line of work) and it rained for much of the day. We decided to shoot near to Honister Pass to explore some woodland that Steve and I had seen previously but were unable to stop the car. This time we found where to park and were able to scramble down to the river.

Initially, I had thought this was going to be black and white shot, but I now like the colour conversion. I have done very little to this image other than applying a Kodak Ektar film simulation in Alien Skin Exposure X3. After that, I added a vignette and positioned the centre of this in the lower third of the frame.

I hope you like the image and have a great weekend.