Tag Archives: Fujinon 10-24

Friday Image No. 187

View from Dale Head looking towards Buttermere in the Lake District, Cumbria.
View from Dale Head looking towards Buttermere in the Lake District, Cumbria. Fuji X-T2, 10-24mm lens, ISO200, 1/70″ at f/11.0. Kase Polarising Filter and 0.6 ND Graduated filter. Handheld.

I must admit that this isn’t the image I intended to share with you today. Unfortunately, it won’t be possible to share the planned image. When I came to switch on my Drobo storage, my Mac won’t recognise it and the unit won’t mount as a drive. I also tried it on my PC, but it can’t be read. Running Windows chkdsk reports a corrupt File Master Table that it can’t fix. I’m sure the images are still on the drive but it’s looking like I need some serious data recovery software.

I will though share this image which I shot earlier in the week. This is the view from the summit of Dale Head in the Lake District. The lake in the distance is Buttermere and the river and road in the valley is Honister Pass. This was a great walk taking us from our accommodation, over Cat Bells followed by Maiden Moore, High Spy, Dale Head and then Hindscarth before descending to Little Town and back to the start (around 23Km).

This was also a memorable walk as I tore the tendon in my knee just as I came off the top of Hindscarth. It took around 3 hours of agony to get down and back to our accommodation. I’m now hobbling around and in the hands of my Physio who’s also treating me for a torn tendon in my shoulder. It’s not been a good week!

I hope you like the photo and have a great weekend.

Heading Out With A Purpose

View across Dovestones, Saddleworth. Fuji X-T2 10-24mm lens, ISO200, f/10.0, 1/55″, 0.9 ND Grad filter

At the weekend, I did something I haven’t done before. I headed up into the hills behind Dovestones reservoir for photography. Now I need to qualify that statement as I have taken plenty of photographs in the area. The difference this time is that I was heading out for the purpose of photography and nothing else. Usually when I take photos here, I’m out walking and happen to have a camera with me.

The problem when you’re out walking is that you have a different primary purpose. You may pause for a few seconds or even minutes to grab a shot, but it can’t compare to dedicated photography. The most noticeable difference for me this weekend was that I would leave the path regularly to find the right viewpoint as well as the best angles and composition. This probably seems obvious but I hadn’t previously realised how wedded to the path I was when walking.

The image above, which is one from the weekend is a good example. To reach this you need to leave the path and scramble over some rocks. You would never achieve this view or vantage point by keeping to the path, even though it’s only around 100m from the path. What it’s made me realise is that whilst I have always maintained that this is a difficult area to photograph, the problem was my approach. I’m now wondering how many other good locations I have missed because I had the wrong primary purpose.

I should also say a big thanks to Dave who was the reason I ventured up to this location in the first place. He had wanted to photograph the Trinnacle rock for a long time (that image is still to come). Although I was never keen to photograph in the area (because I thought it was difficult and I live here) I said I would take him as it can be tricky to find. If it hadn’t been for this I would possibly never have opened my mind to the possibility.

I now can’t wait to get back up there.