Month: May 2017

Manmade Fascination

Posted on


Ogden near to Newhey (North West England). Sony RX10 with 0.6 ND grad filter.

I’m pretty sure most of the regular readers of this blog can see that my passion is the beauty of the natural landscape. What many probably don’t realise is that I have a fascination for manmade objects that have become part of the landscape. Don’t ask me to explain why or how this developed, I just know that some objects in the landscape catch my attention.

The image above is one example. Every time I pass this group of Pylons I spend time trying to capture them with pleasing compositions. I used to think of these as being ugly and a blot on the otherwise perfect landscape. Now I see them and find the interesting. I’m not yet sure I can call these pylons beautiful but they are a challenge to photograph and create interesting shapes.

The wind turbines that now litter our moorland and coastline are similar. I used to think they are ugly but now find them almost majestic. I even included a full-length editing example in one of my books for a wind turbine image.

Does anyone else find these things interesting or is it just me?

Friday Image No.136

Posted on Updated on


Infrared tree study on the banks of Derwent Water. Olympus EM5 converted to shoot Infrared (despite what the file name might suggest)

I’m going to keep this one a short post as its getting very late and I want to pack up for the day. This is another of the tree shots from last weekend. This tree was incredibly photogenic; I don’t know why but I am grateful. It was about the only subject that seemed to work either in Infrared or conventional.

I hope you have a great weekend and if you’re out with a camera, I hope you have better luck than I did.

Being a Successful Photographer

Posted on


Infrared tree study using an Olympus EM5 converted to shoot infrared. The weather on this day was painfully difficult. I considered almost all my images to be failures with the exception of a few shots taken of this tree.

Yesterday I published an article on my Lenscraft website titled “How to become a Successful Photographer”. If you have 5 minutes to spare I would encourage you to head over to Lenscraft to read it. In writing the article, something occurred to me which is obvious and yet we often lose sight of. What do we consider being a successful photographer to be?

For some it may be the ability to earn a living from their photography. For some it may be winning competitions or being accepted by a Gallery.

My own definition of being a successful photographer is being able to consistently produce images that are high quality and which engage with my audience. All the other “measures” mentioned above are for me secondary outcomes. What really matters is the quality of my work and how I as the photographer feel about my work.

What I would really be interested to know is what defines success for you? If you have any thoughts, please add them as comments to this post.

Friday Image No.135

Posted on


Stairs inside the Tate Gallery in St Ives. Sony RX10, ISO 200, f/5.6.

Last Friday I shared a simple image of a plant taken whilst on holiday in St Ives, a couple of years back. What this is really telling you is that I haven’t been taking many photographs recently and I’m now trawling through my archives. Unfortunately, the same is true this week and so I have returned to the same archive.

I know that my first love is the landscape but I also like architecture. This image was taken inside the Tate gallery in St Ives. Whilst everyone else was looking at the exhibits I was admiring the stairway. I did get plenty of odd looks but it’s worth it. I really like the clean lines and proportions.

Have a great weekend and I will see if I can’t shoot some images before next Friday.

I Love Drobo

Posted on


Yesterday, one on my Drobo units warned me that it was running short of space. This is hardly surprising given the amount of video production I have been doing recently.

I opened the Drobo dashboard software and checked the drives. The software showed me the unit had 2 x 2TB and 2 x 1.5TB disks installed. It also indicated I should replace one of the 1.5TB disks with a larger capacity volume, highlighting it amber. The replacement drive I ordered from Amazon was 3TB and cost only £74 including delivery.

Today the drive arrived, I popped the magnetic cover off the Drobo, ejected the recommended disk and inserted the replacement. It took me around 30 seconds to swap the disks and I didn’t even need to turn the unit off. The Drobo dash then popped up a few messages before turning on data protection mode. This is where the content of the Drobo is spread across all the installed drives in case one ever fails. As for the 1.5TB drive, I popped that into my other Drobo unit which had 2 x 4TB, 1 x 1TB and 1 x 500GB disks.

What I find great is, even though the Drobo is busy protecting the data on the disks, I can still use it just as I would normally. In fact, I just finished editing another video lesson, saving it to the Drobo.

This is how technology should work.

Friday Image No.134

Posted on


Pot plant study in Infrared. Olympus EM5 converted to shoot infrared. ISO200, f/4.0, 1/80″, 28mm prime.

First my apologies for not posting a blog article this week. My time was taken up with publishing the monthly Lenscraft newsletter as well as a new video on You Tube. I hate missing a post during the week; it kind of puts you out of your rhythm, making it harder to find the next post.

I’m sat here now looking through images and wondering what on earth I should post. That’s when I  clicked on an old folder from 2015 and noticed the image above. This is nothing more than a digital infrared image of a pot plant. Despite this I find the composition and repetition (but varied sizes) quite appealing. I really must check my archives more often.

I hope you like the image and have a great weekend.